Friday, January 6, 2012

Most Amazing Miniature Food Artworks by Shay Aaron

Miniature Food Sculpture
Shay Aaron is a brilliant artist from Israel who makes the most astonishing miniature food jewelry. These foodstuffs look so beautiful that we would desire to eat them.
Actually, there’s a whole market out there for miniature food. Not actual stuff you can eat, but beautifully hand made designs of steaks, burgers, pies, vegetables, eggs and pretty much anything you can think of.
Miniature Food Sculpture
Miniature Food Sculpture
Miniature Food Sculpture
Miniature Food Sculpture
Miniature Food Sculpture
Miniature Food Sculpture
Miniature Food Sculpture
Miniature Food Sculpture
Miniature Food Sculpture
Miniature Food Sculpture
Miniature Food Sculpture
Miniature Food Sculpture
Miniature Food Sculpture
Miniature Food Sculpture
Miniature Food Sculpture
Miniature Food Sculpture
Miniature Food Sculpture
Miniature Food Sculpture
Miniature Food Sculpture
Miniature Food Sculpture
Miniature Food Sculpture
Miniature Food Sculpture
Miniature Food Sculpture
Miniature Food Sculpture
Miniature Food Sculpture


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Many people pilgrimage to Uluru, but what is seen there often depends on where you've come from. (© Robert Spanring)
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Eruption of the Cordon del Caulle. (© Ricardo Mohr) #
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Beluga whales in the arctic having fun. (© Dafna Ben Nun) #
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This is a streetcar in New Orleans traveling back towards The Quarter on St. Charles Ave. I held the camera against the window sill, making sure to divide the image equally between the inside and the outside. (© Don Chamblee) #
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This image captures almost 6 hours of climbing parties on Rainier going for the summit under starry skies. Wind shifts during the night would cause bands of smoke from fires 100 miles away on Mt Hood to pass over Rainier. This intermittent low-level haze caused the red glow seen in the sky and a Rainier that looks like it was almost painted on. Lights from Sunrise can be seen in the lower right of the frame. (© Chris Morin) #
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Russia, polar region of West Siberia, Tazovsky Peninsula. Reindeer breeding is one of the basic means of employment for the indigenous population of this region. All pieces of land suitable for pasture are assigned to families of reindeer breeders, or Sovkhoz brigades. Reindeer grazing freely in search of reindeer lichen overnight can disperse across few kilometers. Here, the foreman of the shepherds examines a herd with the aid of binoculars. (© Dmitriy Nikonov) #
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An adult male gelada rests in the early morning light after ascending the steep sleeping cliffs of the Simien Mountains, Ethiopia. This male won his right to mate by successfully deposing the old leader. Now he must defend his harem by tending to his females' needs and fighting off anxious bachelors waiting for their chance to become harem leader. (© Clay Wilton) #
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An unexpected side-effect of the 2010 flooding in parts of Sindh, Pakistan, was that millions of spiders climbed up into the trees to escape the rising flood waters; because of the scale of the flooding and the fact that the water took so long to recede, many trees became cocooned in spiders webs. People in the area had never seen this phenomenon before, but they also reported that there were less mosquitos than they would have expected, given the amount of standing water that was left. Not being bitten by mosquitoes was one small blessing for people that had lost everything in the floods. (© Russell Watkins) #
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Curious cormorants watch the start of the Gatorman part of the La Jolla Roughwater Swim. Athletes swim 3 miles from La Jolla Cove to Scripps Pier and back. (© Lee Sie) #
This place is very special to me. The fèllensee is placed at the bottom of the hundstei (dog stone). I know this might sound silly, but since my dog and I grew up just around the corner and the naming of the mountain, I chose this very calm lake as a final resting place for Spock (my dog) so he would have the biggest gravestone of all dogs out there. That morning we had a farewell ceremony for Spock. I took this picture and we summited the hundstei to his honor (which was a very emotional challenge). This picture of his resting place is now hanging in our kitchen to remember him. (© Nino Benninger) #
Copenhagen, The Gemini Towers, private residential building by the river. I had to wait about 2 hrs and hoped some residents would come in or out and kindly let me in. It was worth waiting coz this building its so unreal. (© Elena Baroni) #
Cage divers confront a great white shark. (© David Litchfield) #
Spark trails from cannon blast captured at the Moorpark Civil War reenactment, sponsored by the Moorpark Rotary Club. Soldiers manning the cannon were silhouetted due to a large light behind them shining down on the battlefield. The large flood light made it possible to also see the smoke from the cannon blasts. (© Robert Jensen) #
Snow Geese in flight. Kleinfeltersville, Pennsylvania. (© Charles Funk) #
The awesome power of a tornado displayed in Mapleton, Iowa April 11th, 2011. (© Timothy Wright) #
Yala National park of Sri Lanka is best known for leopards, but of course very difficult to get them in action. This is one of the well grown three cubs got excited and started jumping between branches. I got it against the light within fraction of a second. (© Lalith Ekanayake) #
Rare and endangered Australian Sea Lions (Neophoca cinerea) swim and play in the shallows of Hopkins Island, South Australia. (© Michael Patrick O'Neill ) #
This a portrait that I took of my Grandfather. He was a photographer and I wanted to show all his wonderful old cameras and his life in an editorial styled portrait. He just turned 95 years old and still remembers how all his old camera's work. I shot this with my cannon 7d body,and Tamron 17-55mm zoom lens. The lighting is with a 1200w Pro photo 2 head kit with 2 medium soft boxes. As well I used a 580 ex2 canon speed lite and diffused it with a paper lantern that I made into a diffusion for my speed lite. I really love this picture and hope you like it as well. (© Christopher Bellezza) #
Death valley averages just 1.58 inches of rainfall a year. Yet somehow, in my first trip there in four years, we catch a storm. Not just a storm, an electrical storm. At sunset, of all times. This was the reward for years of trips gone awry, blank skies, drenching downpours, and for every other cause of failed photography endeavors. To me, this is an example of the best thing that can happen to a photographer. To be in the right place, at the right time - and to not mess it up too badly. (© Jeff Engelhardt) #
Within an ultra modern society Japan still maintains to hold traditions passed down from generation to generation making it one of the most beautiful and intriguing places in the world. The city of Gion in Kyoto is one of those places that you will walk into and forget about all the flashing lights the rest of Japan has to offer. Its brick paved streets holds some buildings that have been maintained like the old traditional Japan. If you're lucky you will catch a glimpse of a beautiful geisha passing through the streets scurrying to her next appointment, make sure you have your camera ready. (© Clancy Lethbridge) #
This is a shot of one of the many thermal pools in Yellowstone National Park. (© Danielle Goldstein) #
An extraordinary display of spring frost covering everything in sight. This particular image of a frosted fence with a backdrop of a blue metal dumpster from a construction site was taken in late-March of 2011. (© Sara Worsham) #
After school fun at the river, in Laos. (© Danny Griffin) #
A male jawfish mouthbrooding eggs until they hatch. (© Steven Kovacs) #
This image was taken in wintertime in an arid area of the Canadian Rockies. Temperatures were below 30 degrees Celsius, yet because there was no snow fall the surface of the lake was uncovered allowing me to see and capture the bubbles (gas release from lake bed) that were trapped in the frozen waters. (© Emmanuel Coupe-Kalomiris ) #
Flight of an Eagle owl Photo by Mark Bridger A large adult eagle owl in flight. (© Mark Bridger) #
In a mud pool at the sea salt mines near Bourgas, Bulgaria locals gather. He applies the mud from the pool and then stands upright until it is dry only to take a dip in the nearby sea. Afterwards he gets a relaxing swim in the 30cm of water in the salt mine. (© Antoni Georgiev) #
One morning while on the Big Island of Hawaii, I was exploring my surroundings to see if I could find something to photograph. I almost went back inside when something on this huge palm tree leaf caught my eye. I stayed around and it was this little gecko, startled by my presence he was hidden between the ridges of the leaf. He would pop his head up periodically to check his surroundings; as soon as he saw I was still there he would hide again. We played this game for a while until I got the shot. (© Lorenzo Menendez) #
The weirdest market on planet earth must be the voodoo market in Lome,Togo. Thousands of dead animals are used for religious and health purposes. Freaky, frightening but also fascinating (© Jorgen Tharaldsen) #
My son, Jack, dune jumping. (© Betina La Plante) #
Every year around the month of October, Dubai experiences heavy fog due to the still-high humidity and the falling temperatures. With all the new high-rise buildings (including the tallest in the world, Burj Khalifa), this provides a great photographic opportunity. (© Catalin Marin) #
Bonobo Portrait, Jacksonville Zoo, Florida (© Graham McGeorge) #
Climbing the Harding Ice-field trail in the rain, has its rewards. I stopped to admire glacier, only to find an adult black bear eating in front of a glowing blue glacier. (© Colin McCrindle) #
Nathan Fletcher rides one of the biggest waves ever ridden at Teahupoo, in Tahiti. (© Ted Grambeau) #
Pinki Kundu,a 13 yrs old girl is suffering from a chronic disease & is being treated in Mother Teresa TB Hospital in Kolkata. She is under CAT 1 drug therapy & is doing well.The day I photographed her she was very hopeful mood that she would be returning back to her parents soon. (© Saibal Gupta) #
A Rufous humming bird takes a much need break on a pine tree, boasting his beautifully bright chest. (© Cael Cook) #
At safari not only animals can attract attention. (© Dmitry Gorilovskiy) #
The Himba Women of northern Namibia perfome daily rituals where by they annoint themselves with a mixture of ochre, oil and ash to protect themselves from the harsh desert climate. They never take a shower, but rather burn aromatic herbs in a pot each morning with which they smoke themselves as if applying perfume. (© Dominique Brand) #
Lone Tree Yellowstone Photo by Anita Erdmann A solitary tree surviving another harsh winter in Yellowstone National Park. (© Anita Erdmann) #
This lynx (Lynx Canadensis) flinches its ear at bothersome gnats in the late evening summer sun in Alaska. (© Jimmy Tohill) #
This photo was taken in the Upper Antelope Canyon near Page (AZ) and it shows the amazing effect of the sand thrown in the air and struck by the rays of the sun. (© Angiolo Manetti ) #
A "joey" (baby) Eastern Grey Kangaroo pokes a head out from its mother's pouch. The baby kangaroo will continue to peek until if feels safe enough to emerge for short periods. After 7 to 10 months it will leave the pouch for the last time. (© Brent Lukey) #
Morning light breaking through the windows of the 'Temple of Transition' during the Burning Man event 2011. (© Lars Tiemann) #
The sun gives us energy, even when underwater. This image was captured during free diving (diving on a single breath without scuba gear) in the Red Sea. (© Vaclav Krpelik) #
I have been trying to follow a leopard with cubs for the last year, and spend a lot of nights with them. She has no tracking device, so when I find her I try to stay with her as long as possible. On this particular evening a brown hyena stole her kill (a springbok ) and was sitting on a rock ledge with the moon rising behind her. I lit her eyes up with a torch to make it a bit more mysterious. (© Hannes Lochner) #

Spot on! The artist who lets children cover her white room with colourful stickers

This is what happens when children are given thousands of coloured stickers and a totally white room all to themselves - plus a free reign to express themselves.

Before the kids descended on this all-white lounge the living room looked like a minimalist's dream pad. Afterwards barely a spec of white remained.

But this is no normal living room, this is the latest work of daring 82-year-old Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama. And the finished product is just how she likes it.
All white: The room before thousands of children were let loose on it over a two week period with coloured stickers
All white: The room before thousands of children were let loose on it over a two week period with coloured stickers

Since the 1950s the influential artist has created breathtaking works including the all-white 'Obliteration Room' created specifically to engage children and adults in an art gallery space.
In love with dots: Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama In love with dots: Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama
Even children unable to get to the gallery can also access the online version with Kusama's World of Dots, where Kusama's dots don't always behave as expected!
For 40 years Yayoi has made paintings, sculptures and photographs using dots to cover surfaces and fill rooms, a process she calls 'obliteration', which means the complete destruction of every trace of something, in this case white space.
 


She began to see the world through a screen of tiny dots when she was a small child. For her they covered everything she saw – the walls, ceilings and even her own body.And she began creating paintings using dots in watercolour, oils and pastels when she was just ten years old.
The room, which is part of her 'Look Now, See Forever' installation at the Queensland Gallery of Modern Art, took visitors to the Australian gallery two weeks to create and is now a flurry of colour and random dots.
The work will be on display until March 12.
Yayoi Kusama's art sales are among the highest for a living female artist. She has won many accolades during her long career and spent 16 years living and working the United States before returning to her native Japan in 1973. She has also written novels and released films as part of her lifetime's body of work.

Spot on: Children bring colour to the world of Yayoi Kusama at Queensland Gallery of Modern Art
Little artists: Children bring colour to the world of Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama at The Queensland Gallery of Modern Art

Art attack: One visitor to the Queensland Museum of Modern Art makes her selection as she adds to The Obliteration Room installation
Art attack: One visitor to the Queensland Museum of Modern Art makes her selection as she adds to The Obliteration Room installation
Look carefully: There's a little girl in this image but with her patterned dress she almost disappears into The Obliteration Room at Queensland Gallery of Modern Art
Look carefully: There's a little girl in this image but with her patterned dress she almost disappears into The Obliteration Room at Queensland Gallery of Modern Art

Join the dots: The Obliteration Room after thousands of stickers have been placed all over the white room at the Queensland Gallery of Modern Art
Join the dots: The Obliteration Room after thousands of stickers have been placed all over the original white room at the Queensland Gallery of Modern Art


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2082582/Spot-The-artist-lets-children-cover-white-room-colourful-stickers.html#ixzz1idgeYjOX

Biggest Scientific Breakthroughs of 2011

 

From law-violating subatomic particles to entirely new, earth-like worlds, 2011 was an incredible year for scientific discovery. In the past 12 months, scientific breakthroughs in fields ranging from archaeology to structural biochemistry have allowed humanity to rewrite history, and enabled us to open to brand new chapters in our development as a species.

Here are some of our favorites.

Biggest Scientific Breakthroughs of 2011

The world's lowest density material

With a density of less than one milligram per cubic centimeter (that's about 1000 times less dense than water), this surprisingly squishy material is so light-weight, it can rest on the seed heads of a dandelion, and is lighter than even the lowest-density aerogels. The secret — to both its negligible weight and its resiliency — is the material's lattice-like structural organization, one that the researchers who created it liken to that of the Eiffel Tower.
Biggest Scientific Breakthroughs of 2011

"Feeling" objects with a brain implant

It could be the first step towards truly immersive virtual reality, one where you can actually feel the computer-generated world around you. An international team of neuroengineers has developed a brain-machine interface that's bi-directional — that means you could soon use a brain implant not only to control a virtual hand, but to receive feedback that tricks your brain into "feeling" the texture of a virtual object.
Already demonstrated successfully in primates, the interface could soon allow humans to use next-generation prosthetic limbs (or even robotic exoskeletons) to actually feel objects in the real world.

Astronomers get their first good look at giant asteroid Vesta

In July of 2011, NASA's Dawn spacecraft entered the orbit of Vesta — the second largest body in our solar system's main asteroid belt. Just a few days later, Dawn spiraled down into orbit. Upon reaching an altitude of approximately 1700 miles, the spacecraft began snapping pictures of the protoplanet's surface, revealing geophysical oddities like the triplet of craters on Vesta's northern hemisphere — nicknamed "Snowman" — featured here. Dawn recently maneuvered into its closest orbit (at an altitude averaging just 130 miles). It will continue orbiting Vesta until July of 2012, when it will set a course for Ceres, the largest of the main belt asteroids.
Biggest Scientific Breakthroughs of 2011

NASA's Kepler Mission changes how we see ourselves in the Universe

2011 was a fantastic year for NASA's Kepler Mission, which is charged with discovering Earth-like planets in the so-called "habitable zone" of stars in the Milky Way. Kepler scientists announced the discovery of the first circumbinary planet (i.e. a planet with two suns, just like Tatooine); located the first two known Earth-sized exoplanets; quadrupled the number of worlds known to exist beyond our solar system; and spied Kepler-22b — the most Earth-like planet we've encountered yet. And here's the really exciting bit: Kepler is just getting warmed up.
Biggest Scientific Breakthroughs of 2011

Heartbeat-powered nanogenerators could soon replace batteries

In a few years, you may never have to recharge your phone again — provided part of you keeps moving. Back in March, scientists announced the world's first viable "nanogenerator" — a tiny computer chip that gets its power from body movements like snapping fingers or - eventually - your heartbeat.
The researchers can already use the technology to power a liquid crystal display and an LED, and claim that their technology could replace batteries for small devices like MP3 players and mobile phones within a few years.

Neuroscientists reconstruct the movies in your mind

Back in September, UC Berkeley neuroscientists demonstrated their ability to use advanced brain-imaging techniques to turn activity in the visual cortex of the human brain into digital images. So far, the researchers are only able to reconstruct neural equivalents of things people have already seen — but they're confident that other applications — like tapping into the mind of a coma patient, or watching a video recording of your own dreams — are well within reach.
Biggest Scientific Breakthroughs of 2011

100,000-year-old art kit found in South Africa

Researchers investigating Blombos Cave in Cape Town, South Africa uncovered the oldest known evidence of painting by early humans. Archaeologists discovered two "kits," for mixing and forming ocher — a reddish pigment believed to be used as a dye. The find pushes back the date by which humans were practicing complex art approximately 40,000 years, all the way back to 100,000 years ago.
Biggest Scientific Breakthroughs of 2011

Online gamers solve a decade-old HIV puzzle in three weeks

Foldit is a computer game that presents players with the spatial challenge of determining the three-dimensional structures of proteins, the molecules comprising the workforce that runs your entire body. In diseases like HIV, proteins known as retroviral proteases play a key role in a virus's ability to overwhelm the immune system and proliferate throughout the body.
For years, scientists have been working to identify what these retroviral proteases look like, in order to develop drugs that target these enzymes and stymie the progression of deadly viral diseases like AIDS. It was a scientific puzzle that managed to confound top-tier research scientists for over a decade... but Foldit gamers were able to pull it off in just three weeks.
"The ingenuity of game players," said biochemist Firas Khatib, "is a formidable force that, if properly directed, can be used to solve a wide range of scientific problems."

Ancient settlement upends our perception of human evolution

Tools discovered during an excavation in the United Arab Emirates were found to date back at least 100,000 years, indicating that our ancestors may have left Africa as early as 125,000 years ago. Genetic evidence has long suggested that modern humans did not leave Africa until about 60,000 years ago, but these tools appear to be the work of our ancestors and not other hominids like Neanderthals. That being said, our understanding of how and when humans really evolved continues to take shape…

Confirmed: Neanderthal DNA survives in Modern Humans

Some of the first hard genetic evidence that early Homo sapiens got busy with Homo neandertalensis actually came in 2010, but it was experimental findings published in July of 2011 that really drove the point home. But don't worry — there's still plenty of research to be done on everything from the details of human/neanderthal culture, to the enduring significance of Neanderthal genes in the modern human genome, to the mysterious humanoids, Denisovans.
Biggest Scientific Breakthroughs of 2011

IBM unveils brain-like "neurosynaptic" chips

Back in February, IBM's Watson made history by trouncing Jeopardy champs Ken Jennings and Brad Rutter in an intimidating display of computer overlord-dom. But to compare Watson's computing power to the complexity of a brain would still constitute a pretty epic oversimplification of what it means to "think" like a human, as the way each one processes information could not be more different.
Watson is impressive, to be sure, but in August, IBM researchers brought out the big guns: a revolutionary new chip design that, for the first time, actually mimics the functioning of a human brain.
Biggest Scientific Breakthroughs of 2011

NASA launches the most advanced Martian rover in history

Currently in transit to the Red Planet, NASA's Mars Science Laboratory — aka the Curiosity rover — was launched on November 26th. The rover is scheduled to touch down on Mars inside the mysterious Gale crater in August of 2012. Once it's made landfall, Curiosity will make use of one of the most advanced scientific payloads we've ever put in space to assess whether Mars ever was, or is still today, an environment able to support life — a mission that could redefine the way we think about life in our solar system and beyond.

A device that lets you see through walls

Radar systems that can see through walls (aka "wall-through" radar systems) aren't unheard of, it's just that most of them are burdened by limitations (like a prohibitively low frame rate, or a short range of operation) — that make their use in real world settings pretty impractical. But that could soon change in a big way. The team of MIT researchers featured in this video has developed a device that can provide its operators with real-time video of what's going on behind an eight-inch-thick concrete wall — and it can do it from up to 60 feet away.
Biggest Scientific Breakthroughs of 2011

Electronics and biometric sensors that you wear like a temporary tattoo

Engineers John Rogers and Todd Coleman say that their epidermal electronic system (EES) — a skin-mountable, electronic circuit that stretches, flexes, and twists with the motion of your body — represents a huge step towards eroding the distinction between hard, chip-based machines and soft, biological humans.

Culling senescent cells postpones age-related disease in mice

In the latest effort to make mice immortal, researchers revealed that flushing out so-called senescent (aka old and defunct) cells from the bodies of mice genetically modified to die of heart disease extended the health span of the mice significantly. If you can imagine taking a pill that could stave off the effects of age related disease, then you can appreciate why science and industry alike have demonstrated considerable interest in these and other age-related findings. [Photo by Jan M. Van Deursen Via NYT]
Biggest Scientific Breakthroughs of 2011

Scientists engineer highly virulent strains of bird flu

Two independent teams of researchers recently engineered highly virulent strains of H5N1, more commonly known as the avian flu virus. On one hand, the researchers' work is absolutely vital, because it allows us to get a head start, so to speak, on understanding viruses that could one day pose a serious risk to public health. On the other hand, there are many who fear that findings from such research could be used to malevolent ends were they to wind up in the wrong hands. Included in the latter camp is the federal government, which went to unprecedented ends to make sure that the experimental methods behind creating the strains never made it to the pages of either Nature or Science.
Regardless of your position, the development of these strains raises important questions about the nature of dual-use research, transparency, and censorship.
Biggest Scientific Breakthroughs of 2011

The hunt for the Higgs boson nears its conclusion

It's been a long, long time coming, but earlier this month, representatives from the Large Hadron Collider's two largest experiments — ATLAS and CMS — announced that both research teams had independently uncovered signals that point to the appearance of the Higgs boson — the long-sought sub-atomic particle thought to endow all other particles with mass. "Given the outstanding performance of the LHC this year, we will not need to wait long for enough data and can look forward to resolving this puzzle in 2012," explained ATLAS's Fabiola Gianotti. If the puzzle is resolved with the discovery of the Higgs, it will represent one of the greatest unifying discoveries in the history of physics.
Biggest Scientific Breakthroughs of 2011

Faster-than-light Neutrinos

By now, the neutrinos that were supposedly caught breaking the cosmic speed limit in Gran Sasso, Italy need no introduction. Scientists the world over continue to offer up critiques on the OPERA collaborative's puzzling results, especially in light of the team's most recent findings — acquired from a second, fine-tuned version of the original experiment — which reveal that their FTL observations still stand.
Of course, the most rigorous, telling, and important tests will come in the form of cross-checks performed by independent research teams, the results of which will not be available until next year at the earliest. And while many scientists aren't holding their breath, the confirmation of FTL neutrinos could very well signal one of the biggest scientific paradigm shifts in history.


Oct 7, 2011 - Ten Years Later




Ten years after the start of the Afghanistan War, here's a look at where US priorities lie.

 











































































































































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