Tuesday, February 1, 2011

gambar menarik

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Anti-tank dog
war dog During the Second World War, the Russian Army came up with an ingenious defence against German tanks. Starving dogs would have bombs strapped to them, and then sent toward the enemy vehicles. The dogs had been trained to retrieve food from under Russian tanks, and the idea was that they would dash under the German tanks, seeking food, and in doing so activate a large wooden trigger on their backs. Unfortunately, having been trained using Soviet tanks, the dogs of war much preferred running under Russian tanks. Added to that, the noise of the battlefield confused and frightened them, culminating in an entire troupe of bomb-dogs running amok in a battlefield, endangering everyone and forcing the retreat of the Russian forces. Although credited with the destruction of over 300 Nazi tanks, the dogs were retired from service shortly after.
M-388 Davy Crockett
m388Nuclear devices already rate pretty highly on the stupidity scale, in terms of general wanton destructiveness and lasting radioactive fallout. So what better idea could there be than removing all due process behind launching such a hell-spawned weapon, and instead put that decision in the hands of a lowly infantryman? The M-388 did exactly that – it was the world’s first, and thankfully only, handheld nuclear delivery system – an atomic bazooka. With a range of less than 3km, and poor accuracy even at that stones-throw distance, the Davy Crockett’s only effectiveness was one of area-denial, instantly rendering a battlezone an inhospitable, radiation-soaked hellpit. For at least 240,000 years.
FP-45 Liberator
fp35The Liberator was a pistol maufactured in the US during the Second World War. Made from stamped and bent sheet metal, the Liberator was designed to be produced quickly and cheaply, and dropped into occupied territory as an insurgency weapon. With an unrifled barrel, the Liberator had a maximum effective range of just 25ft. Of course, “effective” in this occasion had little meaning, seeing as the empty shell casing had to be removed with a wooden dowel before the next shot could be fired. This way, the FP-45 took longer to reload than it did to manufacture – ten seconds to seven seconds respectively. In fact, the only useful function of the Liberator was to incapacitate someone long enough to take their weapon. In other words, the US could have shipped out the lump of metal they began with, and had an equally effective weapon.
No 74 ST Grenade
n74 During the Second World War, the British military removed much of the bureaucy surrounding weapon development, hoping to foster an increased rate of innovation. This also allowed many absurd and impractical ideas to reach the front line, including the No 74 ST Grenade, or sticky bomb. The sticky bomb was designed to act against enemy tanks, and consisted of a glass ampule of nitroglycerin attached to a plastic fuse. This was encased inside a knitted wool ’sock’ coated in sticky resin, and the whole grenade then encased inside a protective metal case. Although effective in combat, the fragile glass casing easily cracked during transport, the explosive was highly volatile, and worst of all, the sticky coating often glued an armed grenade to the thrower’s clothing, making it a very unpopular weapon.
Fusen bakudan
fusen bakudanJapanese fusen bakudan, or balloon bombs, were used during the Second World War to strike at the US mainland. Small hydrogen balloons were fitted with anti-personnel and incendiary explosives and launched on trade winds toward the US. The idea was that the bombs would set light to forests and damage cities. In reality, of over 9,000 balloons launched by the Japanese, only 300 were sighted by Americans. Once the US forces realised what was happening, air patrols regularly shot down the balloons; in addition the campaign had begun in Autumn, when woodlands were too damp to ignite. The only casualties of the fusen bakudan were a group of Oregonian picnickers who tried to move a landed bomb. Early on, the US government imposed a media blackout on the balloon bombs, and the Japanese gave up their campaign just six months later, rightly assuming from the lack of panic that their weapon had been a failure.






THE MAN WITH NO FACE
Jose Mestre suffers from a very serious facial tumor called a haemangioma which has grown to a staggering 12 pounds and has obscured his facial features.  A Jehovia's Witness, Mestre refuses to have certain procedures done to have the tumor removed.  Mestre became blind in one eye, had difficulty eating, and began to have breathing problems because the tumor was starting to block his airways.


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The good news is that this story does have a happy ending.  Jose finally consented to the surgery in October of 2010 and had the tumor removed.  As of this writing, he is expected to have more surgeries to correct his facial features.





OF ALL THE PEOPLE
IN ALL THE WORLD
Of All The People In All The World, a traveling art exhibit in the UK, uses grains of rice to bring the large numbers behind world populations to the grasp of the average human being.
In the exhibit, one grain of rice equals one person and those grains of rice are put together to represent all kind of statistics from the small (such as the number of people who have walked on the moon) to the large (the population of the United States as seen below).


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Captured Blog: Seven Years
1
A tail gunner sits in the rear of a US Army CH-47 Chinook as part of US Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld's helicopter entourage, as he visits Kandahar, Afghanistan 13 April, 2005. (GERALD HERBERT/AFP/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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A British soldier from the Grenadier Guards Regiment smokes a cigarette at the Delhi Patrol Base (PB), a location in the desert in the Garmsir District, May 6, 2007 in Helmand Province, Afghanistan. British troops are in the front line of the effort to suppress the efforts of Taleban insurgents to regain control of southern Afghanistan, with the threat of a reinvigorated spring offensive from the militants looming large on the horizon. (Photo by Marco Di Lauro/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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A village elder bids farewell to an American soldier after a meeting between the military and local leaders in the town of Gayan October 22, 2006 in the Paktika province of eastern Afghanistan. U.S. military officers there routinely meet with influential Afghans in the area to hear their concerns and to try and get information related to Taliban activity in the area, which stradles the border with Pakistan. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
4
American forces pass through the vast arid landscape June 23, 2006 near Deh Afghan in the Zabul province of Afghanistan. Troops from the 2nd Battalion of the 4th Infantry Regiment were returning from almost two weeks at a remote firebase fighting Taliban insurgents as part of Operation Mountain Thrust. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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A US soldier (L) sits in the rear of a Marine Chinook helicopter while flying over Camp Bastion in Helmand province, southwest of Kabul on May 3, 2008. Some 3000 British troops together with Danish, Estonian, Czech and American soldiers are stationed at Camp Bastion. Helmand, the main source of Afghanistan's opium output, is in the grip of a Taliban-insurgency launched after it was toppled from government in a US-led invasion in late 2001. Most ISAF soldiers in Helmand are British, and were joined by US Marines last week in a push to remove the Taliban from around southern Garmser district. (MASSOUD HOSSAINI/AFP/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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U.S. Army Cpl. Shane Reese from San Clemente, California, hunkers down in a bunker with follow soldiers during a Taliban rocket attack October 23, 2006 at Camp Tillman in the Paktika province of eastern Afghanistan. It was the second day in a row that Taliban insurgents had fired on the camp, although no one was injured. American forces responded with artilery fire. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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U.S. Army Col. Paul Calbos and Afghan police Maj. Gen. Dalut Zai Esmatollah sit atop a rusted Soviet tank overlooking Panjwai June 12, 2006 an area west of Kandahar, in southern Afghanistan. Coalition and Afghan forces launched a fresh offensive against Taliban insurgents in Panjwai today, and two Canadians were wounded in the fighting. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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US Army soldiers from 2-506 Infantry 101st Airborne Division and Afghan National Policemen and Army take cover from dust and debris from a UH-47 Chinook helicopter landing to pick them up during day three of Operation Shir Pacha into the Derezda Valley in the rugged Spira mountains in Khost province, along the Afghan-Pakistan Border, directly across the border from Pakistan's lawless Waziristan region, on November 22, 2008. US Soldiers joined by the Afghan National Army launched Operation Shir Pacha in the Spira mountains arriving in mountain villages not operated in by coalition forces in approximately two years in an effort to disrupt Taliban safe havens in the region. (DAVID FURST/AFP/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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Members of the district council of the Afghan town of Mus Qala dine with a British and American delegation on March 23, 2006 in Musa Qala in the southern Afghan province of Helmand. An advance team of British forces has been meeting with district leaders throught the province ahead of the arrival of the Helmand Task Force which which should be fully deployed by June. The British troops will face a strong Taliban presence in Helmand which many say is financed by protection money from the massive drug trade. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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U.S. Army Spc. Kyle Stephenson, 21, passes through a village during a mission to overlook a Taliban position October 28, 2008 in the Korengal Valley in eastern Afghanistan. American forces from 2nd Platoon Viper Company of the 1-26 Infantry occupied the strategic mountaintop, and were shot at by Taliban insurgents. No Americans were injured in the ensuing firefight and Taliban casualties were unknown. The Korengal Valley is the site of some of the heaviest fighting of the Afghan war. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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The sun rises as seen from a a U.S. Army helicopter flying over the Kunar River October 21, 2008 near Asadabad in the Kunar Province of eastern Afghanistan. American military units there are engaged in some of the fiercest fighting with the Taliban in the country. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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US Army soldiers from 2-506 Infantry 101st Airborne Division and Afghan National Army soldiers take cover from dust and debris as a CH-47 Chinook helicopter lands to airlift them back to their forward operating base during day five of Operation Radu Bark VI, in the Spira mountains in Khost province, 5 kms from the Afghanistan-Pakistan Border, directly across the border from Pakistan's Waziristan region, on November 15, 2008. US Soldiers along with the Afghan National Army launched Operation Radu Bark VI in the Spira mountains setting up a patrol base along a known insurgent infiltration route, at altitudes up to 10,000ft, conducting dismounted maneuvers in the mountains, and setting up observation posts throughout the area. (DAVID FURST/AFP/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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U.S. Army Sgt. Matthew Hendrickson looks into Pakistan from an American forward observation post October 20, 2006 overlooking the Afghanistan-Pakistan border, from the Paktika province of eastern Afghanistan. The outpost, only 800 meters from the border, is frequently attacked by Taliban forces, many of whom cross over from the South Waziristan tribal area of Pakistan, according to American soldiers. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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An American soldier holds a U.S. Army hand grenade on which a soldier wrote "One free trip to Allah" while at an observation post in the Paktika province of Afghanistan Oct. 20, 2006 overlooking the Afghanistan-Pakistan border. The outpost, only 800 meters from the Pakistan, is frequently attacked by Taliban forces, many of whom cross over from the South Waziristan tribal area of Pakistan, according to American soldiers. Most Taliban believe they are fighting a holy war or "jihad" against non-Muslims in Afghanistan, and those who die in jihad are promised an eternity in paradise. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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U.S. Army Spc. Kevin Yeatman, 21, (L) scans a Taliban position October 28, 2008 in the Korengal Valley in eastern Afghanistan. American forces from 2nd Platoon Viper Company of the 1-26 Infantry occupied a strategic mountaintop, and were shot at by Taliban insurgents. No Americans were injured in the ensuing firefight and Taliban casualties were unknown. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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An Afghan boy raises his clothes for U.S. Marines, from the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit, so that he can be checked before passing by a military position near the town of Garmser in Helmand Province, Afghanistan, Thursday, May 1, 2008. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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A U.S. Army humvee gunner rides past a shrapnel-pocked wall from a Taliban rocket October 15, 2006 at Camp Tillman, Afghanistan just two kilometers from the Pakistan border. Some 20 rockets were fired at the U.S. camp manned by soldiers from the 2-87 Infantry just the previous night, although no one was injured. Army officials say that Taliban insurgents continue to mount attacks from the Pakistani side of the border. Camp Tillman was named for former Arizona Cardinals football star Pat Tillman, who gave up his NFL career and joined the U.S. Army Rangers to fight in the war on terror. He was killed in 2003 while on combat operations in Afghanistan near the Pakistan border. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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U.S. Marines, from the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit, return fire on Taliban positions near the town of Garmser in Helmand Province of Afghanistan Friday May 2, 2008. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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A U.S. Army translator and American soldiers hand out propaganda flyers October 21, 2006 in the Village of Lowar in the Paktika Province of eastern Afghanistan. The U.S. troops were distributing flyers urging the population to back ISAF coalition forces against Taliban insurgents in the area which stradles the border with Pakistan. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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A US soldier sits watches over helicopters at Bastion military airport in Helmand province, southwest of Kabul on May 3, 2008. Some 3000 British troops together with Danish, Estonian, Czech and American soldiers are stationed at Camp Bastion. Helmand, the main source of Afghanistan's opium output, is in the grip of a Taliban-insurgency launched after it was toppled from government in a US-led invasion in late 2001. Most ISAF soldiers in Helmand are British, and were joined by US Marines last week in a push to remove the Taliban from around southern Garmser district. (MASSOUD HOSSAINI/AFP/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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U.S. Marine 2nd Lt. Mark Greenleaf, from the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit, calls orders to his men as they return fire on Taliban positions near the town of Garmser in Helmand Province of Afghanistan Friday May 2, 2008. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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U.S. Army 1LT Matthew Hernandez looks down the Korengal Valley from a mountaintop outpost October 24, 2008 in the Kunar Province of eastern Afghanistan. The remote and isolated area is the site of some of the heaviest fighting between U.S. forces and Taliban insurgents. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
23
U.S. Army officers fly back to the unit headquarters following a memorial service for Sgt. John Penich October 23, 2008 at the Korengal Outpost in the Kunar Province of eastern Afghanistan. Penich, from Beach Park, Illinois, was killed by a mortar round while in combat October 16. Soldiers from Viper Company of the 1st Battalion 26th Infantry based in the Korengal Valley battle Taliban insurgents on a daily basis, seeing some of the heaviest fighting of the Afghan war. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
24
US Army soldiers from 2-506 Infantry 101st Airborne Division patrol past a mountain village during day three of Operation Shir Pacha into the Derezda Valley in the rugged Spira mountains in Khost province, along the Afghan-Pakistan Border, directly across the border from Pakistan's lawless Waziristan region, on November 22, 2008. US Soldiers joined by the Afghan National Army launched Operation Shir Pacha in the Spira mountains arriving in mountain villages not operated in by coalition forces in approximately two years in an effort to disrupt Taliban safe havens in the region. (DAVID FURST/AFP/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
25
A suspected Taliban insurgent is detained by Afghan forces during a joint operation between Afghan and Pakistani troops on their volatile border between the Afghan Paktika province and Pakistan's South Waziristan tribal area on October 19, 2006, Afghanistan. The U.S. Army coordinated the joint operation in an effort to improve coordination between the two armies on the porous border, the site of constant Taliban incursions and attacks. Afghan and Pakistani forces each searched compounds on their respective sides of the border, coordinating through American radio contact. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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A U.S. Marine, from the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit, patrol near the poppy fields in the town of Garmser in Helmand Province of Afghanistan Monday, July 7, 2008. The U.S. Defense Department has extended the combat tour of 2,200 Marines in Afghanistan after insisting for months the unit would come home on time. (AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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An Afghan boy blows bubbles given to him by U.S. Army troops (seen in the background) December 3, 2002 during a U.S. military civil humanitarian mission in the village of Tadokhile in central Afghanistan. The mission provided more than a hundred Afghan men, women and children from the village with free medical care and basic dentistry as part of the ongoing Operation Enduring Freedom. U.S. military leaders have recently indicated a shift away from combat operations in the war in Afghanistan while increasing the emphasis on civil humanitarian efforts to rebuild the country and provide stability for the new government. (Photo by Scott Nelson/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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British troops from 13th Air Assault Regiment and a U.S. Marine from the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit, forth from right, watch as palettes of water bottles drift to the ground on parachutes as NATO planes make a resupply airdrop to a forward operating base in southern Afghanistan Saturday, April 26, 2008. Some 3,500 U.S. Marines arrived in Afghanistan to help NATO's increasingly bloody fight against the Taliban. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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U.S. Marines, from the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit, return fire on Taliban positions near the town of Garmser in Helmand Province of Afghanistan Friday May 2, 2008. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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Artillerymen fire a 155mm Howlitzer at a Taliban position October 22, 2008 from Camp Blessing in the Kunar Province of eastern Afghanistan. Their unit, Charlie Battery, 3rd Battalion of the 321 Field Artillery, has fired more than 5,900 shells since they deployed to Afghanistan less than a year ago, making it the busiest artillery unit in the U.S. Army, according to to military officers. They most often fire in support of Army infantry units fighting Taliban insurgents in the nearby Korengal Valley, the site of some of the heaviest fighting in Afghanistan. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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ANA ( Afghan National Army) Soldiers search an allegedly suspected Taliban, later released, during "Lastay Kulang" Operation on May 30, 2007 in Sangin Valley, Helmand Province, Afghanistan. British troops from The Inkerman Company, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, part of ISAF Task Force Helmand, are mentoring the Afghan National Army while conducting security operations on behalf of the Government of Afghanistan in Helmand Province.(Photo by Marco Di Lauro/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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U.S. Army soldiers pay their respects at a memorial service for Sgt. John Penich October 23, 2008 at the Korengal Outpost in the Kunar Province of eastern Afghanistan. Penich, from Beach Park, Illinois, was killed by a mortar round while in combat October 16. Soldiers from Viper Company of the 1st Battalion 26th Infantry based in the Korengal Valley battle Taliban insurgents on a daily basis, seeing some of the heaviest fighting of the Afghan war. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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The coffin containing the body of British Army soldier L/cpl Paul "Sandy" Sandford from the Worcestershire and Sherwood Foresters Regiment is carried by his fellow soldiers to the airplane that will bring him back to the United Kingdom during his repatriation ceremony on June 9, 2007 in Camp Bastion, Helmand Province, Afghanistan. British troops from various regiments including the Worcestershire and Sherwood Foresters Regiment held a repatriation ceremony for Sandford, a British soldier killed in action on June 6, 2007 in Afghanistan. (Photo by Marco Di Lauro/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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British paratrooper from 3rd Battalion The Parachute Regiment Pvt. Paul Coleman, 21, from Coventry, England, prepares to go on patrol at his base in the Kandahar football stadium on June 21, 2008 in Kandahar, Afghanistan. British Paratroopers conducted operation 'Daor Bukhou' by flying in hundreds of paratroopers from 3rd Battalion The Parachute Regiment into the football stadium of Kandahar City for the first time since 2001 to provide a presence in the city to support the Afghan National Security Forces in their battle against the Taliban. The regiment was extracted from the stadium on June 22, 2008 upon completion of their mission. (Photo by Marco Di Lauro/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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British Soldiers from the Royal Artillery Regiments on duty at their combat security outpost on May 15, 2007 in Southern Helmand Province, Afghanistan. Nato troops operating in the south and in the province of Helmand are preparing for a new wave of the offensive after US-led Afghan troops killed the Taliban's top military commander Mullah Dadullah last weekend. (Photo by Marco Di Lauro/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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British Army soldiers and officers from various regiments stand lining up as the plane that will bring back the coffin containing the body of L/cpl Paul "Sandy" Sandford arrives during his repatriation ceremony on June 9, 2007 in Camp Bastion, Helmand Province, Afghanistan. British troops from various regiments including the Worcestershire & Sherwood Foresters Regiment held a repatriation ceremony for Sandford, a British soldier from Worcestershire and Sherwood Foresters Regiment killed in action on June 6, 2007 in Afghanistan. (Photo by Marco Di Lauro/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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(L-R) British Army Anaesthetist Lt. Col. Ian Hicks and British Army Medical Emergency Response team Sgt. Mark Mitchell and Sgt. Gavin Carr from the UK Med Group prepare to get on the helicopter to go to the front line to collect a casualty on June 11, 2007 at the British Army Field Hospital at Camp Bastion in a location in the desert in the Helmand Province in Southern Afghanistan. The British Army hospital in Camp Bastion, run by the United Kingdom Joint Force Medical Group, provides the medical cover for all ISAF personnel operating in Helmand Province in Southern Afghanistan. In addition to the British, Danish, Estonian, Czech and American troops, who operate under the command of Task Force Helmand, the British hospital treats significant numbers of Afghan patients from across the spectrum of conflict, including Afghan National Security Forces, Taliban and civilians. The hospital, although situated in a tent, is the most advanced in southern Afghanistan. The medical team have developed groundbreaking trauma management practices including the use of consultants as part of its Medical Emergency Response Team. Early use of senior medical expertise ensures that clinical assessment can be started the moment a casualty is retrieved from the battlefield. This unique method of reducing time spent in medical reception and stabilisation has enabled patients to move from helicopter to operating table, via accident and emergency, sometimes in less than twenty minutes. The hospital boasts a five-bed accident and emergency department incorporating two portable digital x-ray machines, a CT scanner and an operating theatre where two patients can simultaneously undergo surgery. Ward space is provided for 25 (surging to 50) casualties including up to eight intensive therapy beds. (Photo by Marco Di Lauro/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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Village elders speak with a U.S. Marine (L), through an interpreter as Afghan forces search for weapons October 25, 2008 in the Korengal Valley of Kunar Province in eastern Afghanistan. Taliban insurgents enjoy widespread public support in the contested valley, site of some of the heaviest fighting between U.S. forces and the Taliban. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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British Army Officer, Captain Edward Janvrin from the 2nd Battalion of the Royal Gurkha Rifles, attached to the Inkerman Company, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards look at Taliban positions as he directs air strikes from the ground during "Lastay Kulang" Operation on May 31, 2007 in Sangin Valley, Helmand Province, Afghanistan. British troops from The Inkerman Company, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, part of ISAF Task Force Helmand, are mentoring the Afghan National Army while conducting security operations on behalf of the Government of Afghanistan in Helmand Province. (Photo by Marco Di Lauro/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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British paratroopers from 3rd Battalion The Parachute Regiment deploy into the Kandahar football stadium on June 19, 2008 in Kandahar, Afghanistan. British Paratroopers conducted operation 'Daor Bukhou'by flying in hundreds of paratroopers from 3rd Battalion The Parachute Regiment into the football stadium of Kandahar City for the first time since 2001 to provide a presence in the city to support the Afghan National Security Forces in their battle against the Taliban. (Photo by Marco Di Lauro/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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British Paratroopers from the 3rd Battalion Parachute Regiment deploy from Chinook Helicopters during an operation to capture Taliban leaders on July 5, 2008 in the village of Segera, Kandahar Province. Afghanistan. The 3rd Battalion Parachute Regiment conducted a joint operation with U.S led Task Force Paladin and Afghan Border Police in the village of Segera in the Province of Kandahar to capture Taliban leaders. According to the military, during the operation about eight Taliban were captured and detained. (Photo by Marco Di Lauro/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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British Paratroopers from the 3rd Battalion The Parachute Regiment deploy from royal Air Force Chinook Helicopter during an operation to search three compounds and look for weapons on July 1, 2008 in Salavat, Panjawi Province, Afghanistan. The 3rd Battalion The Parachute Regiment conducted a joint operation with Canadian-led Task Force Kandahar, U.S.-led Task Force Paladin, Afghan National Army (ANA) and Afghan National Police ANP) in the village of Salavat in the Province of Panjawi to search three compounds, of which one was a mosque, to seize weapons and fight against the Taliban. According to the military, during the operation about ten Taliban were killed and 200lbs of explosives confiscated. (Photo by Marco Di Lauro/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
43
British Army trucks from the 13 Air Assault Support Regiment drive through the desert at sunrise after the overnight break during an operation to deliver supplies to several British Army Forward Operating bases (FOB) in the Helmand Province on July 17, 2008 in the Helmand Province, Afghanistan. The 13th Air Assault Support Regiment provides logistic support to the multi-national force in Helmand Province. The British drivers navigate hostile desert terrain to deliver combat supplies, ammunitions, food, water and engineering equipment. During a recent operation, drivers spent 48 hours avoiding enemy forces, mine fields and indirect fire. On return to Camp Bastion, vehicles are serviced immediately for further operations leaving little recreational time for the British soldiers who work in heat reaching 54 degrees celcius and drive on terrain without recognizable roads. (Photo by Marco Di Lauro/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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A British Army soldier from the 3rd Battalion The Parachute Regiment walks during a sand storm as he prepare to leave for strike operation Southern Beast on August 2, 2008 at their base at the Kandahar Air Field (KAF) in Kandahar, Afghanistan. The British Army soldiers from the 3rd Battalion The Parachute Regiment spearheaded a strike operation in the Maywand District of the Kandahar Province, setting the conditions for a permanent ISAF presence to support the Afghan National Government in their fight against the Taliban. Striking within one of Afghanistan's major opium producing areas the Paratroopers were looking for weapons, drugs, and individuals related to the Taliban. During the operation about seventy kilograms of opium was seized and some weapons were recovered. (Photo by Marco Di Lauro/Getty Images)
Captured Blog: Seven Years
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LCPL Jordan Mitchell of the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit plays a hand held video game lying on his cot next to his humvee at a forward operating base in southern Afghanistan Friday, April 25, 2008. Some 3,500 U.S. Marines arrived in Afghanistan to help NATO's increasingly bloody fight against the Taliban. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder)





































































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